News and Media

Hurricane Dean – Update #3

2007-08-16

Update #3

Today at 10:00 AM EST, Hurricane Dean was located about 100 miles south of Grand Cayman Island, moving west at 18 mph with maximum sustained winds at 150 mph. Dean is a Category 4 hurricane, and is forecasted to hit the southern Yucatan Peninsula early tomorrow morning, and move inland north of Veracruz, Mexico around noon on Wednesday.

Due to delays caused by Hurricane Dean, we will divert the Sea Gale voyage 32N into Port Everglades, FL putting the vessel back on schedule for voyage 34S out of Port Everglades, FL on Thursday night, August 24th. All Jacksonville, FL cargo will be railed or trucked to Port Everglades, FL for loading on the Sea Gale.

We will continue to monitor the storm and evaluate the possible effects it could have on our operations. Crowley will continue to update you as more information becomes available, and as the track of the storm becomes clearer.

====================

Update #2

At 2:00 PM EST today, August 17, Hurricane Dean was located at 14.8N/63.6W, which is about 200 miles south-southeast of the island of St. Croix, moving to the west at 22 mph. A recon plane inside Dean has found that it is now a major Category 3 hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 125 mph.

Dean remains on the previously announced track and is expected to pass over the northern Yucatan Peninsula on Monday then make a turn toward the area between northern Mexico and southwest Louisiana.

The Sea Gale was delayed working in Barbados but should dock this afternoon around 500 pm, discharge, and then continue on to Jacksonville.

We will continue to monitor the storm and evaluate the possible effects it could have on our operations. Crowley will continue to update you as more information becomes available, and as the track of the storm becomes clearer.

=========================

Update #1

Dean, which has become a Category 1 hurricane since the last update, continues on the same general path, though just a little more north, and will pass near the island of Martinique about daylight on Friday. It is moving to the west at 24 mph with maximum sustained winds of 90 mph and is expected to move through the Caribbean Sea over the weekend and pass over the Yucatan Peninsula midday on Monday, August 20. The high pressure area north of Dean will begin to weaken on Monday and this could allow Dean to make a turn to the northwest where the projected landfall could be anywhere between southern Mexico as far east as southeastern Louisiana.

The Sea Gale, which is currently working in St. Vincent, will wait south of Barbados until Dean passes, then will make her Barbados call. The only delay to cargo in Barbados would be the time it takes for the storm to pass. Delays to southbound ships and barges are not expected at this time.

We will continue to monitor the storm and evaluate the possible effects it could have on our operations. Crowley will continue to update you as more information becomes available, and as the track of the storm becomes clearer.

============================

At 10:00 am, Wednesday, August 15, 2007, Tropical Storm Dean is located near 12.4N/45.8W, or about 1050 miles east of St. Lucia moving to the west at 17-19 mph. Maximum sustained winds have increased to 60 mph.

Latest information indicates that high pressure will remain strong to the north of Dean through the next 5 days. This will prevent Dean from taking a northward track and will also keep Dean moving at a fairly rapid forward speed. The current track should take the center of Dean into the Caribbean near St. Lucia Friday morning then west-northwestward toward southern Jamaica by Monday morning.

It is now looking like Dean will threaten the Gulf of Mexico in 6-7 days. Though Dean is a tiny tropical storm, and squalls extend out only 40 miles from the center, it is expected to grow in size before it reaches the Caribbean Sea but should remain smaller than average as it crosses the Caribbean. Dean is expected to grow to hurricane strength tomorrow and will have winds of 90-100 mph as it enters the Caribbean Sea.

Delays to Crowley ships in the southern Caribbean are very possible, but delays to Crowley vessels from the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico north not expected at this time.

We will continue to monitor the storm and evaluate the possible effects it could have on our operations. Crowley will continue to update you as more information becomes available, and as the track of the storm becomes clearer.

Please rely on Crowley for schedule changes and operations updates should there be any. Crowley sailing schedules are always available by visiting http://www.crowley.com/liner-shipping-services/services.asp

In an effort to provide you with the best service possible, we ask for your feedback. Please let us know how we’re doing by completing a short online survey at Survey.